Squat and squashed stitches – what are they?

Squat and squashed stitches – what are they?

with 8 Comments

For many stitchers, they are happily stitching along and then all of a sudden, they run into a weird symbol on their chart, like the stitches have gotten squashed vertically or horizontally. After running to grab their reading glasses, they confirm that yes, they aren’t going crazy. These are called squat stitches (or squashed stitches, or half stitches by Heritage Crafts, or even vertical/horizontal split stitches). Despite the plethora of names, they are the same thing — the chart grid squares are split in half either vertically or horizontally. Squat stitches are usually used to add more detail in a pattern in a small space, like for a face as shown below. They’re a type of fractional stitch, and here is more information on basic fractionals like quarter stitches if you need.

 

Many designers do use squat stitches, like my friend Shannon Christine, a detail of her Tropical Mermaid pattern is shown below. Usually you’ll find squat stitches in more advanced patterns such as those by Heritage Crafts or John Clayton, as well as of course Shannon’s designs. They allow more detail to be added in a smaller space such as for faces, hands, etc.

 

Usually these stitches are meant to be used on higher thread count linen and evenweave when stitching over two (it’s possible on Aida but tricky as you have to pierce in the centre of each block). Instead of going up two over two like you’d normally stitch over two, you’d go up one over two for a horizontal squat stitch, and up two over one for a vertical one.

 

 

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Summary
Squat and squashed stitches - what are they?
Article Name
Squat and squashed stitches - what are they?
Description
Learn what squat stitches are (also called squashed stitches or half stitches), and how to do them in this easy video tutorial.
Author
Publisher Name
Peacock & Fig
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8 Responses

  1. Beverly
    | Reply

    What is the best way to handle a design that has single stitches and/or changes colors frequently

    • Dana Batho
      | Reply

      You just stitch as normal. 🙂 I use small knots, or run the ends under other stitches. I also don’t give a toss about carrying my floss across the back, as long as it’s not more than a couple of inches as that can get problematic later. Just experiment and see what works best for you, there are no rules. 🙂

  2. Crystal Foster
    | Reply

    I think I’ve come across this one time in the years I’ve been stitching, I don’t recall the pattern I was doing at the time though.

    • Dana Batho
      | Reply

      Yeah they’re not super common, but they definitely do rear their head every now and then…. 🙂

  3. Melodie Freund
    | Reply

    I am going to stick with simple patterns for a very long time!

    • Dana Batho
      | Reply

      Ahaha you can do whatever you like Melodie, that’s the great thing about stitching! But if you do decide to go a more advanced route at some point, you won’t be scratching your head if you do come across squat stitches. 🙂

  4. Jyl Milner
    | Reply

    Thanks for this informative tutorial! I’ve been stitching for many years and have never run into a squat or squashed stitch, but now I won’t be concerned if I do.

    • Dana Batho
      | Reply

      Glad it helps Jyl! They’re not suuuuper common, but they definitely are out there, especially if you do tend towards the more complex patterns. 🙂

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