Stitching over one on linen and evenweave

Stitching over one on linen and evenweave

with 14 Comments

If you’ve ever wondered whether you’re defective because you can’t quite figure out why your stitches keep popping out or sliding when you try and stitch over one on linen and evenweave, don’t fear grasshopper. This tutorial will show you all the tricks you need to know to make your stitching experience far more enjoyable when stitching over one with cross stitch, and let you reach for your glass of wine out of enjoyment and not frustration. 🙂

 

Not sure what stitching over one even means? Check out this handy dandy tutorial and explanation of stitching over one versus stitching over two. 🙂

 

 

Stitching over one tips

English method:

  • Making new stitches from right to left, start your crosses from the bottom left to the top right
  • If the warp thread goes under the weft thread, then the second half of the stitch starts from the “under”  (bottom) side (under = under). 
  • If the warp thread goes over, then the second half of the stitch starts from the “over”  (top) side (over = over). 

 

Please note: While filming the tutorial I made a mistake, and showed laying down the individual stitches for the English method from left to right. To prevent the third stitch from “popping out” when you come up from the bottom left to start, ensure you’re travelling from right to left when doing horizontal rows of stitches.

Stitching over one English method

Danish method:

  • Making new stitches from right to left, start your crosses from the bottom left to the top right
  • Finish the crosses from the top left to bottom right

Stitching over one Danish method

 

Summary
Stitching over one on linen and evenweave
Article Name
Stitching over one on linen and evenweave
Description
This tutorial will show you all the tricks you need to know when stitching over one with cross stitch on linen and evenweave fabric.
Author
Publisher Name
Peacock & Fig
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14 Responses

  1. Cathy
    | Reply

    Dana, would you consider making a video about magnifying lights? I’m considering buying one but I’m not sure which will be the most comfortable to use. Maybe a desk light with a flexible neck or the type on a string that would hang round my neck. Which would be in the way the most? Thank you. Your videos are very helpful and informative, I’m learning lots and getting more confident to tackle bigger projects and beads!

    • Dana Batho
      | Reply

      Hi Cathy! Unfortunately I can’t do a review on those lights — I don’t own one myself and I’m not going to buy a bunch of them just to do a review (which I’ve done for stuff like needle or needle threader reviews, but magnifying lights are much more expensive and bulky). It’s up to how each person stitches, like I used to have a light that had a magnifier as well, and it made me insane as I had to keep my stitching the exact perfect distance away for it to be in focus. I stitch reclined with heat on my neck due to my injury, so that was too hard. I also could never use one that goes around my neck, because I am reclined and sometimes even wearing a hood up on a jacket is too much weight on my neck and shoulders, let alone a heavy magnifier. My best advice is to just experiment and see what works best for you, everyone’s stitchy set up and preferences are different. If you buy something you don’t end up liking, there are lots of stash unload groups online you can resell it in. 🙂

  2. FL SandyToes
    | Reply

    Hi Dana,

    Love your videos, they’re always very easy to watch, at least on my Mac and TV. What do you mean when you talk about the third stitch “popping”?

    • Dana Batho
      | Reply

      If you watch what I’m doing in the video, because I showed making the stitches from left to right, the very last step of the second stitch is going down at the bottom right corner. That’s the same corner the next stitch would need to come up, thus the stitch would “pop” out, your second stitch’s last arm wouldn’t stay in place. 🙂

      • FL SandyToes
        |

        Ah, thanks! Yeah, I’ve done that. I try to come up in an empty corner, but sometimes I get distracted and when I pick my work up again, I forget where the last leg went down. Oops!

      • Dana Batho
        |

        Haha yeah it happens, but because this method relies on doing the stitches in a specific order and direction, that’s why I put the note in the video saying you should work right to left (not left to right as I showed) — then there are no issues with stitches popping out. 🙂

  3. Jyl Milner
    | Reply

    Wish I had seen this wonderful advice 40 years ago as a newbie stitcher working on the only fabric I could find in small-town Ohio – 22 count hardanger, which I worked one over one because I didn’t know any other options! It’s amazing that I still love cross stitch after that rough start! But love it I do, and I’ve been soaking up your tutorials because things have changed a lot in those years, and you’re teaching me some great new methods – new to me, at least!

    • Dana Batho
      | Reply

      Glad you enjoyed the tutorial Jyl! And sorry it was a wee bit “tardy…” 😀

  4. Marny CA
    | Reply

    Difficult to watch – you move too much … and the evenweave you would up with a straight stitch. Hmmm.

    • Dana Batho
      | Reply

      I’m sorry Marny, it looks like I’m moving so much because I had to zoom in so much to where I was stitching — without a professional macro film camera (which can cost thousands) I have to rely on zooming in and cropping the filmed area (which makes it look like I’m moving too much). I did say in the video that I would also be explaining what to do as well in case the viewer couldn’t see it well. And I don’t understand what you mean by “the evenweave you would up with a straight stitch”, that doesn’t make any sense to me. Sorry you didn’t enjoy it more, but it sounds like you already know what to do to stitch over one. 🙂

  5. Wanda McIsaac
    | Reply

    I used to stitch the English method when I first started doing cross stitch, about , many decades ago. Now I use the Danish method it’s neater and quicker for me, at least. I use short needles when I work on linen or any fabric more than 22 count. I also need to use a well lit magnifying glass.

    • Dana Batho
      | Reply

      Yeah those magnifying lights are genius, they’re so handy when doing finer work. 🙂 I use a mix of English and Danish, depending on what part of the pattern I’m doing. 🙂

  6. Deborah Crozier
    | Reply

    looks like you are using ball point needle. Who makes them and where can I get them. Thanks

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