/ / / Hardanger experiment complete
Hardanger experiment complete

Hardanger experiment complete

with 6 Comments

It’s amazing, despite everything that’s been going on recently, I actually managed to finish a project. I bought a little hardanger kit in Belgium a few months back, and started working on it a week or so ago (I posted about the first half of my efforts here). The hardanger kit was a little tricky at first for me to understand as I’d never done it before (and there was no real legend of which stitch was which symbol in the chart), but I managed to figure it out.

 

I think it came out really well considering it was my first time doing this craft, and that I’m usually not into dainty or traditional crafts. I did add a little bit of extra fabric onto the end of the piece (as I’d accidentally started too far down the piece of fabric so the envelope would have been a little too short). I did some more kloster blocks and cut away the fabric like in the main flap of the envelope, but my scissors did catch a few of my stitches as I was trying to carefully cut away two layers of fabric. I’m not that worried as it was just a test piece. I’m not even sure what I’ll use the envelope for and I managed to fix the cut thread areas not too terribly.

 

Here’s the video I made of how I did the cutout areas on the envelope flap, if you have any questions or comments of course please let me know below! 🙂

 

 

Hardanger envelope
Hardanger envelope
Summary
Hardanger experiment complete
Article Name
Hardanger experiment complete
Description
A video of how to do cutout areas in hardanger needlework, and the finished product - a lovely hardanger envelope.
Author
Publisher Name
Peacock & Fig
Publisher Logo

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterPin on Pinterest
Follow Dana Batho:

Artist and Designer

I am an artist, veteran, analyst, and mommy to the sweetest dog ever. I am constantly thinking of ways to use my creativity in everything I touch despite my physical limitations, and I love encouraging others to do the same.

6 Responses

  1. Ria Harriss-van der Salm
    | Reply

    Dear Dana
    just joined your site after watching your Hardanger video. Loved the way you explained it all even though you never worked Hardanger before. Sorry to hear you got hurt in training. I served for 42 years with the Womens Royal Netherlands Navy Service. 19 years on actual service and the remainin 23 years as a civilian with the Defence Department. I have never been on a mission sol not a Veteran. I admire your work for Vets!!!
    By the way Hardanger is Norwegian form of handicraft and not Danish as you said in the video. Bye for now, looking forward to other parts of your crafts.

    • Dana Batho
      | Reply

      Thanks very much for your comment Ria! I’m sorry I said Danish, I must have read that somewhere. 🙂 It’s a very pretty technique, I had a lot of fun working on that project. I have family in the Netherlands (Amsterdam), I rode through the Netherlands 2 years ago with Wounded Warriors Canada. We finished our ride at Groesbeek Canadian War Cemetery in Nijmegen, it was a very moving experience. Thanks for your service as well, and happy stitching Ria! 🙂

  2. John Bozich
    | Reply

    That looks awesome. Even more amazing that it was a first for you. I’m also a veteran hooah!!

    • Dana Batho
      | Reply

      Haha thanks very much John, and that’s cool you’re a vet too! I got hurt on training, so I had to “adapt” how I do things now. Stitching and design are some of the few things I can still do with my upper body limitations, even though I had to make some adaptations. And thanks! it was a fun little project, I much prefer souvenirs I can do something useful with. Once I’d figured out how to read the pattern, it wasn’t so bad, I just had to be reallllly careful when snipping the threads! 🙂

  3. Nina
    | Reply

    This turned out very nice! Excellent job!

    • Dana
      | Reply

      Thanks very much Nina, I appreciate that! I’m pretty happy with it, I’m looking forward to seeing what I end up doing with the techniques I learned doing that project. 🙂

Leave a Reply

Want exclusive free cross stitch patterns and much more?