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Gridding cross stitch fabric

Gridding cross stitch fabric

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Recently I was online in one of the Facebook cross stitch groups I belong to, and a woman had never tried gridding cross stitch fabric, was having issues figuring out how to do it. I’d never really thought about how that might be confusing for some people – I’m really mathematically and artistically inclined so I saw someone else’s image of a piece of gridded fabric and just figured out how to do it on my own. In order to make the process easier to understand, I’ve made a video outlining how to draw a grid (10×10 stitches) onto 14 count Aida fabric. The process would be the same for any thread count, but if the fabric isn’t white then it might be a good idea to invest in a coloured fabric pen or mechanical fabric pencil. If you search “mechanical fabric pencil” online, there are hundreds of products that come up in many different colours.

 

One thing to note is that before gridding cross stitch fabric is to consider how long you will likely be stitching the piece for. Is it a small piece you’ll have done in a few weeks, or is it a larger piece that could take years to do? For larger pieces I would suggest gridding your lines using “thread.” At the beginning of the video I show a small sample of 22 count fabric that I gridded using sewing thread. I have done one small piece like that, but I found my needle did pierce the thread so it was hard to pull the thread out cleanly at the end. If you prefer stitching your gridlines rather than drawing them, there is a product called Easy Count Guideline that is a thin nylon thread. There is a link to a demonstration video on their home page, and then the thread is really easy to pull out and reuse as it’s not going to get split or caught into the needlepoint itself. There is also fabric called Magic Guide by DMC that comes pre-gridded, and the lines wash away with water (in the video I wasn’t sure about that, but I checked). Obviously the colours and sizes available for Magic Guide are going to be more limited than other types of non-gridded cross stitch fabric, but it might be just the solution for someone not wanting to spend a lot of time gridding out a piece. You can also stitch your grid lines in with fishing line like in this tutorial. For linen and evenweave fabric, because it’s so fine you may also find it much easier to grid with stitching rather than by drawing the lines on. I’ve also heard that fabric that has been gridded with fabric markers may have the lines “reappear” if the fabric gets too cold. This happened to one stitcher I know — she mailed her piece to be entered into a competition, but as the mail got cold during the trip when her piece arrived the gridlines had reappeared in her stitching.

 

In the video I do show a brief overview of a water-erasable fabric pen I just bought, but do be aware of the issues with fabric markers I mention above. I do the demo in the video using a regular mechanical pencil (and erasing the lines with an artist eraser). Unfortunately the leads in the mechanical pencil were a bit too soft (so the lines were darker), so the pencil lines smudged a bit when I tried to erase them. When I did the gridding on my big Michelangelo piece that I talk about in the video, I used a different mechanical pencil that had harder leads in it (and thus the lines could erase cleanly as they were lighter). I didn’t trial the pencil I did use before filming the video, but in actual practice it’s not that big of a deal as I was just gridding that piece as a sample for the video (and I was pressing harder so the lines would be more visible on camera). Of course the next piece I do I will be testing the pencil or pen and make sure it’s ok for the piece of fabric I’ve chosen (and made sure my blazing hot apartment hasn’t softened the erasers just enough they smudged the pencil rather than erasing the lines cleanly). You live and learn, but as long as the method is clear about what to do that’s what is important to me.

 

 

free cross stitch patterns

 

 

cross stitch gridded fabric example
cross stitch gridded fabric example

Here is a small quick illustration of what a piece would look like fully gridded out. In the example I’ve said it’s 65 stitches across and 95 stitches down. So you would need 7 ten-by-ten grids across to accomodate the 65 horizontal stitches (with 5 stitches in the last column unused), and 10 ten-by-ten grids down for the 95 vertical stitches (again, with 5 left over). You should also allow for 3″ of margin on all sides of the fabric to make sure there’s enough excess to put into a hoop for sewing or to use in framing the piece when it’s done. All patterns will have a stitch count (if not on the cover of the pattern then in the pattern itself), and you can calculate the dimensions of the finished piece by dividing the number of stitches by the thread count of the fabric. So for the example above, if the piece is 65 stitches across and I’m using 14 count fabric (which means 14 stitches per inch), the finished size would be 65/14 = 4.6″. So the piece would be 4.6″ across, meaning the fabric would need to be at least 10.6″ across (as you need to add 3″ of margin to each side, making an extra 6″ added to the finished piece size). If the same piece was done on 22 count fabric, it would be 65/22 = 2.95″ (plus the extra 6″ of margin). If you have a hard time with math, it’s ok. Just draw a little picture like I’ve done and work slowly at figuring out how many grids you will have, how wide and long your fabric needs to be, etc. If you’re really stuck, leave a comment below with where you’re having a hard time and I’ll help you figure it out (I know I’m nuts, I actually do really like math).

 

 

 

I hope that all helps! If you have any questions or need something explained better, please let me know in the comments below!

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Gridding cross stitch fabric
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Gridding cross stitch fabric
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Gridding cross stitch fabric and other needlework projects doesn't have to be hard, and gridding your fabric can really help with big projects.
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Peacock & Fig
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Artist and Designer

I am an artist, veteran, analyst, and mommy to the sweetest dog ever. I am constantly thinking of ways to use my creativity in everything I touch despite my physical limitations, and I love encouraging others to do the same.

42 Responses

  1. Wendy
    | Reply

    Dana, Thanks for answering my question. Just to make sure, if I’m working on 32 count fabric, I count 32×32 squares on my fabric for my grid lines.

    • Dana Batho
      | Reply

      Hi Wendy! No, you won’t make 32×32 blocks on your fabric — usually patterns are gridded 10×10. The grid you put on your fabric is exactly the same number of stitches as on your pattern, otherwise there’s no point in gridding. So if your pattern has 10×10 grids, then you’ll make 10×10 grids on your fabric. If you’re stitching over 2, then your grids on your fabric will be 20×20 (which equals blocks of 10 actual stitches). Does that make sense?

  2. Rachel
    | Reply

    Also, do you know how to do the loop method or some type of method other than a knot with just one string? My kit came with these colors wound around a cardboard insert. The string is actually 2 strings together…. but you can’t really separate them (it’s not easy to pull them apart. So essentially it’s one piece of string made up of two micro strings). If I double it, then I’ve got 4 strings. So I can’t do that.

    And I can’t figure out a way to tie my needle bc the knot keeps coming undone and then I lose my needle. Just started 2 days ago but a few kinks.

    1) need a method that does not create a knot for an odd number of strings
    2) need to know how to knot my needle thread bc I keep losing it.

    Thanks!

    • Dana Batho
      | Reply

      Hi Rachel! What you’re looking for is a pin stitch, it’s a way to anchor your floss with an uneven number of strands. If you search “loop method” in the search bar on my site, you’ll see a video that has the loop method at the beginning, and a pin stitch at the end. And I’m not sure what you mean by your floss. Most embroidery floss is a thick strand consisting of 6 finer strands, you’d separate out the strands and use however many the pattern says to. If the pattern says to use two strands, you can separate out two strands and use them, or use one strand folded in half (making two). You don’t tie the floss to your needle, the knot would catch every time you pull your needle through the fabric. You just hold the tail end of the floss against the needle as you’re pulling it through the fabric. Keep a tail of a few inches, and just don’t pull the needle so hard you pull it off the floss. Hope that helps! πŸ™‚

    • Rachel
      | Reply

      Hey! So I started my first ever project. Idk if I mentioned I’m sure you’ve seen it. It’s Van Gosh Starry Night 16×12. I thought about a scroll but I looked at the reviews and they were terrible (no tension) so while browsing hobby lobby bc I lost my only needle I found these yarnology q clips or whatever. They are a square frame that holds the fabric taught, as you would of thought a scroll should. Anyways, made my work so much faster!

      So I learned that … you don’t need to tie a knot in the thread around the needle bc you’re right. All it does is catch. I learned that after I commented on here lol. The kit came with thread wrapped around a piece of cardboard and it’s 2 strands already spun together (can’t separate) so that’s why I can’t do the loop method. I just watched your pin stitch vid and I am so excited to try that!! It’s going to make my piece look so much cleaner start to finish. My very first cube looks like a matted mess on the back.

      I also watched your grid video. Made my grid. Then guess what. The legend was 2 pages, where they connect is ELEVEN boxes wide. So the middle of the legend is a 10×11 square and it completely messed my entire project up. I kept thinking β€œwhy is this not lining up am I missing something” then I thought about completely omitting that whole column but…. I’m just gonna go with it. See what happens bc idk what to do now. Sorry this is probably really confusing. But thank you so much for all your help gosh I seriously didn’t expect to love this as much as I do. I hope it’s not bad for my eyes. I’m 29 and literally have that aida like 1 ft from my face.

      Love from KY!

      • Dana Batho
        |

        Booo that sucks about the grid being off, maybe whoever made the pattern is using non-professional software or something. πŸ™ I’d just work around it, it’s a pretty expressive painting with lots of movement, you can afford to be a little “fudgy” with the details in that centre section. Keep the sections on either side the same, then just work around the main details in the centre section and kind of wing it. No one will ever know, and it will all come out fine. πŸ™‚ I’d also contact whoever you bought the pattern from, that’s a pretty big error and they should fix the pattern. Good luck! πŸ™‚

  3. Rachel
    | Reply

    I like the information in your videos for the most part, it kind of seems like your breathing is labored or maybe you’re wheezing?? Like you’re out of breath talking.

    Why would you want to erase the line after you’ve covered it up with the stitch? What is the need to erase the grid?

    Just picked up a 16×12 Vincent van gogh Starry Night and I’ve never ever cross stitched. It is a great hobby I really enjoy it so far.

    • Dana Batho
      | Reply

      Hi Rachel! No, I’m not wheezing, I’m not sure why it sounds like I am. And you’d only erase the lines (like the grid that’s extended beyond the stitching area) that aren’t covered by stitches, or if a bit of the lines are still visible. πŸ™‚

  4. Wendy
    | Reply

    Dana,
    If you were gridding 22 count fabric, for instance, and are stitching 1over2, would you count 20 of those teeny weeny squares.

    • Dana Batho
      | Reply

      Hi Wendy! Yes I would, you want your gridding to match the grid on your fabric. So if you’re stitching over 2 strands, then to get your grid of 10 as per your pattern, you’d actually be counting over 20 on your fabric. Hope that helps! πŸ™‚

  5. Hilary Ben Yitzchak
    | Reply

    my chart does not have obvious grid lines. the colours of the stiyches are quite random, so gridding would be useful but as it is very difficult to see grid lines this isn’t much use. any suggestions?

    • Dana Batho
      | Reply

      Hmmm, that’s very weird, I’ve never seen a pattern that doesn’t use grid lines. Maybe it was made by someone who doesn’t really know how to make patterns, I’m not sure. What I’d do is if you have a printed version of the pattern is to draw your own gridlines on the pattern, every ten rows and columns. You could use a highlighter, or a pencil, just make your new grid lines visible enough to see without blocking the pattern details. πŸ™‚

  6. Tammy
    | Reply

    You are my hero! I have done counted cross stitch for over 30 years and have never heard about this magical solution! Thanks for the great tutorial, will be trying this as soon as I finish my halloween sampler.

    • Dana Batho
      | Reply

      Hi Tammy, sorry it took me a few days to reply (I was away for Thanksgiving). Gridding is such a genius method, it works so well. In the post I did link to one using fishing line (or any nylon thread, Sulky Sliver, etc) — that’s really good if you’re concerned your pencil lines won’t erase (or could get your floss dirty), or your fabric marker lines not erase or come back later. I grid now using stitched lines, it goes pretty quickly once you have a few rows done and then you just pull the grid lines out when you’re finished stitching. You can even reuse them. πŸ™‚

  7. Penny from az
    | Reply

    Hi love your video did I understand your reply that if I grid my fabric I don’t have to begin my project in the center? Thank you

    • Dana Batho
      | Reply

      Hi Penny! That’s correct, because when you grid you’re replicating the darker lines on your pattern. So all you need to do is look at the row and column number on your pattern, and you can easily find the exact same spot on your fabric. You can either just count the grid lines on your fabric, or write the numbers or label them in some way. In this blog post there’s also a linked article about how to grid by stitching your lines in. It’s actually preferable to stitch your lines in (using something like fishing line or Sulky Sliver metallic thread). Then you don’t have any issues with your drawn lines not erasing or reappearing (which can happen with some fabric markers). πŸ™‚

  8. Pamela
    | Reply

    I loved your video. I’ve been cross stitching on and off for 30 years and this is the first time I’ve heard about gridding the whole piece! I so wish I’d known about it before. I am now a quarter of the way through a counted birth sampler. Animals in four corners, different measurements! Baby’s long name in the centre. I sewed grid lines across horizontal and vertical centre but so wished I had thought about the whole thing! My giraffe’s face is now in the the last couple of letters of baby’s name! 😱πŸ˜ͺ. I have just finished unpicking the doomed animal, at least, the bits I’d stitched first because it looked ominous the further up I went! The pattern had a short name so the picture on the front looked lovely! Needless to say, this is the first birth sampler I’ve ever stitched. Your method of gridding will be my new best friend from further projects.

    • Dana Batho
      | Reply

      Hahah awww, I’m so sorry your giraffe was doomed! It happens to the best of us, gridding is a really good way to make that a lot less likely. I prefer sewing my grid lines in now when I’m working on a big piece, then you can just pull them out at the end and there are no worries about lines not erasing, etc. There’s a link to the gridding with fishing line post in the article, but if you’ve already sewn in some basic grid lines you know what you’re doing already. πŸ™‚ Good luck with finishing the project, and happy stitching Pamela! πŸ™‚

  9. Trina
    | Reply

    Hi! I’ve been looking at a mechanical chalk pencil at my local embroidery store for this very purpose. Do you think it would work for gridding or would I rum the risk of it not washing out?

    • Dana Batho
      | Reply

      Hi Trina, thanks for your question! I’ve never heard of a mechanical chalk pencil — you’d have to get a very fine pencil to draw your grid lines with, and I have a sneaking suspicion that a chalk pencil is too soft to be able to get that fine. If you’re worried about your lines not coming out, then just stitch your grid lines in with fine fishing line or nylon thread (or Sulky Sliver thread). Then you just pull the lines out at the end, you don’t have to worry about damaging your fabric at all. There’s a link in the post that goes to that tutorial as well. πŸ™‚

  10. Sarah Lair
    | Reply

    I just gridded my piece for the first time using mechanical pencil. I had to erase a few that were outside the “frame” and it doesn’t feel like they’re coming out completely, but figured that they would with washing. I’m using white fabric and the first section is white thread as well. The thread looks gray now :(. Is this common? Don’t want to keep putting time in to this method if it’s going to mess everything up. Tia.

    • Dana Batho
      | Reply

      Hi Sarah, thanks for your question! It does depend on your eraser, some erasers do erase more cleanly than others (I don’t know if you tested the eraser on your fabric before gridding all of it). In the video I’m using an artists vinyl eraser, they’re really good at pulling graphite off of surfaces cleanly. Once you get out as much as you can with the eraser, I’d gently handwash the areas that are a bit gray. I use clear shampoo and barely warm water, but you can use whatever you’d normally use to wash your projects after stitching. You can also spot clean the fabric with a bit of detergent and a soft, damp cloth. Make sure the cloth won’t stain your fabric though, use a white cloth if you have one. If the graphite doesn’t completely wash out the first time, do try it again, sometimes graphite (and dirt) can get a bit trapped in the fibres and need a bit of encouragement to get out. Just be gentle with your stitching, you don’t want to scrub it hard at all. Once you finish getting the graphite out, I’d wash the entire piece to make sure you don’t get any marks from bits of soap left in areas. That should get it all out. I hope that helps, good luck! πŸ™‚

      • Sarah Lair
        |

        Thanks so much for your speedy response. Is it normal for it to turn the white thread gray?

      • Dana Batho
        |

        Hi Sarah, you’re welcome! It can happen, but I haven’t had it happen personally as the large pieces I do grid are full coverage. Basically what’s happening is the eraser is picking up the graphite, and if the eraser then touches the stitching, it can “deposit” the graphite back onto the floss instead of it erasing away cleanly. If you do try to erase more of it, make sure your eraser is moving away from the stitching (and preferably not touching it at all), then more graphite won’t get dropped onto the floss if that makes sense. πŸ™‚

      • Sarah Lair
        |

        Sorry, I wasn’t clear. The graphite is transferring to the thread as I stitch.

      • Dana Batho
        |

        Oh, well in that case you probably drew the lines on too heavy, or the pencil is too soft (HB pencils are harder, B pencils are softer). If you can I’d erase where you’re going to be stitching in predominantly white. In the video the piece I was working on had some white areas, but I didn’t find the graphite transferred at all as I drew the lines on as lightly as I could and have them still be visible. So if you can, I’d erase where you’re going to be working mainly in white, and you can regrid that area with fishing line or nylon thread if you need the lines. There’s a link to that tutorial in the blog post, then you just pull the lines out. πŸ™‚ I probably won’t be able to respond again straight away for now, it’s Canada’s 150th birthday and I’m about to head out (just don’t want to leave you hanging). πŸ™‚

      • Sarah Lair
        |

        Thanks sooo much for your help. And happy birthday to Canada πŸ‡¨πŸ‡¦!

      • Dana Batho
        |

        Ahaha you’re very welcome Sarah, I hope you can sort it out! And thanks! πŸ™‚

  11. Helen Richardson
    | Reply

    I am trying to grid my fabric for the first time ever (although I have been stitching for years). I am doing a fractal on black 14 count. The finished size will be 25 x 25 so my fabric is 30 x 30. Should I start my gridding from the center and work out to the edge or start from the edge and work to the opposite edge?

    • Dana Batho
      | Reply

      Hi Helen! Whatever is easiest for you — I usually start from the edge (in your case, 2.5″ in from one side as you have a 5″ border all around), but if it’s easier for you to start in the middle then do that. Just remember that you’ll be gridding in blocks of ten, so figure out where the most central grid lines will be on your pattern if you want to start in the centre. You may end up with a gridline right at the halfway point, or you might have a block of 10 “straddling” the exact centre of the fabric, depending on your exact stitch count. Does that help?

  12. Chrissey
    | Reply

    I was struggling with marking my fabric, my sister who lives in Australia is a Quilter she told me of the pen that’s looks like a felt tip pen but it washes out
    ITS FABULOUS. I highly recommend them ..it’s like the pen shown in the video

    • Dana Batho
      | Reply

      Haha that’s great Chrissey! Just be careful with some of those pens — some of them don’t actually fully wash out, or the lines reappear later. In another tutorial (that I’ve linked in this one), I show how to grid with fishing line or nylon thread. That’s great as you can just pull the line out at the end of your stitching project, and it doesn’t leave any permanent marks. πŸ™‚

  13. Carol Renteria
    | Reply

    I don’t want to look foolish but, you erase your mechanical pencil lines “after”? you’ve stitched your project? Wouldn’t that pull/tug on your finished product making it look kinda of “ragged”? I’ve always used one strand of DMC to grid my pattern but think using a pencil would be nice to try if it really worked. PS I love your video tutorials πŸ™‚

    • Dana Batho
      | Reply

      Haha no it’s not a foolish question at all Carol! I would only erase sections that were open and unstitched — the stitching covers the rest. When I finished that pattern, I did erase around the edges of the stitching in the margin, but even that I didn’t really need to do as I matted it right up to the edge of the stitching when I framed it. πŸ™‚ And you could also use fishing line to grid your fabric instead of some DMC — I have a tutorial about how to do that here — https://peacockandfig.com/2016/12/cross-stitch-gridding-fishing-line/. Then it’s a lot less expensive than gridding with DMC, and you can pull your grid lines out when you’re finished stitching. Then your stitches don’t get caught up in the line as well, as your needle can’t pierce it (and it’s fine enough it doesn’t interfere with how your stitches lie). The only issue with using pencil is you do have to really test whether it will erase fully or not before gridding your whole project (if it’s not full coverage). Some fabrics are softer than others, and some erasers will pick up the graphite better than others. πŸ™‚

  14. Penny
    | Reply

    I am trying to get motivated and make time for a new large cross stitch project. I completed a couple approx 12″x12″ pieces about 20 years ago and want to take it up again but this time using stretcher bars. Question about drawn-on grid lines (I didn’t do that before – used unmarked Aida!) If the piece is completely stitched and has no unstitched areas, is there a need to erase or otherwise remove grid lines? For the large grayscale piece in the video, it seems to me that grid line removal wouldn’t be necessary. Is there another reason for removing grid lines even if they aren’t visible in the finished piece?

    • Dana Batho
      | Reply

      Hi Penny, that’s a great question! I would say it depends what you gridded with. If it was with light pencil lines and you can’t see them from the front of the stitched piece, then don’t worry about it. Graphite is incredibly stable (as can be seen by the existence of some very old pencil drawings), so it won’t “leach” onto the floss or stain the fabric. Fabric marking pens are a different story. I don’t really use them much so I can’t speak from experience, but there is always the possibility that the ink could eventually discolour the fabric to the point that the lines are visible (even through the stitching), or leach onto the floss with age. I think the chances of that happening are very low, but it would depend on the quality of the pen, where the stitching is stored, etc. I have heard of fabric marking pen lines reappearing even after being washed out, simply because the piece got cold in the mail or an aircraft cargo area. For the big piece that I was working on in the video, I only removed the grid lines from around the outer edge of the stitching (in the margin), just to make framing a little easier. But since the matting covered the margins anyway, I didn’t even really have to do that. It all depends on what you’re gridding with (with pencil, you wouldn’t be able to erase the lines once they’re stitched over anyway), and how you’re finishing the project. If a margin will show (and thus the gridlines), then definitely get rid of them. If it’s going to be fully framed with matting, then that’s your choice whether to remove the lines or not. I’d try and rinse out lines from a fabric marker anyway just to prevent any potential leaching of pen dye, but I think the chances of that happening are pretty low. Thanks for your question, does that help? πŸ™‚

  15. Barbara
    | Reply

    I have used the blue water erasable pen on off white aida cloth and because I took quite a while finishing my design I found that after I had washed my the design the blue marker had faded the material leaving a grid on parts that were not sewn, very disappointing after all the hard work.

    • Dana Batho
      | Reply

      Awwww I’m so sorry that happened to your piece Barbara!! I guess it depends how old the pen was too, but it really shouldn’t do that. It is possible that with time those faded areas will darken slightly. I found one article that suggests washing the piece again with white vinegar in the water, but that woman was having a problem with the blue marked lines going brown, not bleaching the fabric — http://www.quiltersreview.com/water-soluble-marking-pen-nearly-ruins-a-quilt/. And here’s another article about various methods to try (in the comments), but again they were having problems with the lines showing up brown — http://circle.sewweekly.com/forum/topics/help-so-called-washable-fabric-markers-not-washing-out. If all else fails, maybe take it to a good dry cleaner. Often they have years of experience with fabrics and stains and all sorts of things, so they might be able to give you some suggestions. Let me know if anything works for you!

  16. Shirley Hickman
    | Reply

    Thanks for your response. I’ll keep your info in mind.

    • Dana
      | Reply

      Hi Shirley, did you ever figure out how to get the gridlines out of your piece? I hope so, I can just imagine how hard that would be after all the work you put into your piece.

  17. Shirley Hickman
    | Reply

    Sorry. I kept trying to fill in my name but I couldn’t. Also I could not type in my email address. However, my name is Shirley Hickman. I am a Youtuber. I have a question. When you demonstrating how to grid fabric, one of the items mentioned was a mechanical pencil. How do you remove the graphite once the project is completed? I used a pencil. I tried to erase the gridlines, I soaked the fabric in cold water with dishwashing liquid and neither worked. Finally I gave up, sprayed the project with Shout, stuffed it into a sock and washed it with a load of clothing in my washer. Guess what, I can still see the lines. What do you suggest. I’d laugh if I hadn’t spent so much time stitching it. πŸ™‚
    I like the mechanical pencil cause I can see the lines more clearly and the lines don’t wear off when the fabric is being handled during the stitching.

    • Dana
      | Reply

      Hi Shirley, thanks for your question. I’ll email you about the issues you were having entering your contact information. As far as the pencil lines, I found that using a white vinyl artists eraser worked really well for me in removing the pencil lines. In the video you can see the one I used smudged them a bit, but when I used a different eraser (I have several floating around) it worked perfectly. I’m thinking the particular eraser I happened to grab to use for the video demo was an older one or something, it sure wasn’t the one that I had done the test with before I started gridding out the big Michelangelo piece I’m currently working on. And I completely understand your frustration in not being able to get the pencil out, I’d be frustrated too. I’d do a bit of research online and see if there are any tips for removing pencil marks, then mark up a scrap piece of your fabric with pencil and see if any of the tricks works. It may just need a second bout with the Shout, or some other stain remover (orange-based stain removers often work really well but I’d do a test sample first to make sure it’s not going to damage your fabric or make any of your floss colours run). I’m not sure of the size of your piece, but if worse comes to absolute worse you could fill in the areas that are visible with floss the same colour as the backing fabric. It’s not an ideal solution obviously and it will take more time, but at least then you won’t be able to see the grid lines. I’m really sorry you’re having so much difficulty with the pencil, please do let me know what you end up trying and what works. If I was right there with you I’d love to help you figure it out, but I’m thinking that you’ll just need to do a bit of experimenting as each fabric would react differently to different cleaning methods (and some pencils are darker than others). Good luck, please do stay in touch and let me know how it goes!

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