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Beginning and ending threads in cross stitch: loop method & pin stitch

Beginning and ending threads in cross stitch: loop method & pin stitch

with 16 Comments

I was online this week participating in one of my cross stitch Facebook groups, and several people were asking how to anchor their thread. I mentioned that I use the loop method to start, and a pin stitch to finish. A few in the conversation didn’t know what a pin stitch was. Up until a few months ago,I didn’t know what it was either (or the loop method). But I started reading more about cross stitch and following along with several Facebook groups, and I learned a lot. After a discussion about the loop method to start and a pin stitch to end, I looked these techniques up. I quickly learned how to do them, and between the loop method and the pin stitch, they save me so much time. As an added bonus, they don’t leave lumps on the back of the fabric. I also don’t have to ever flip my sewing frame over, as I can do both from the front of the fabric. This is so great, with a neck injury it can be really difficult to have to keep flipping over a big sewing frame. Now the only time I need to flip my project over is if I’ve gotten a giant knot of floss on the back of my project. Thankfully, that’s pretty rare, so I can work mainly from the front of my piece only.

 

So, as these techniques really helped me, I wanted to share what I learned. I figured the world needed one more cross stitch how-to YouTube video (also called “Flosstube” videos amongst those who stitch). I used my current Michelangelo piece as my basis for the demonstration, and at the top of the page is a picture of how I’m going so far with that piece. [Update: this project is now complete, you can see the finished piece and purchase the Shades of Grace cross stitch pattern here. And this tutorial video is now one of the most popular videos on the Peacock & Fig YouTube channel.] 🙂

 

 

What about you, how do you prefer to anchor your threads? Let me know in the comments below!

 

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Summary
Beginning and ending threads in cross stitch: loop method & pin stitch
Article Name
Beginning and ending threads in cross stitch: loop method & pin stitch
Description
A video tutorial of how to use the loop method and the pin stitch to anchor your thread when doing cross stitch or other types of embroidery.
Author
Publisher Name
Peacock & Fig
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Follow Dana Batho:

Artist and Designer

I am an artist, veteran, analyst, and mommy to the sweetest dog ever. I am constantly thinking of ways to use my creativity in everything I touch despite my physical limitations, and I love encouraging others to do the same.

16 Responses

  1. Yvonne Holmes
    | Reply

    I would like info on how to finish the backs of cross stitched cards.
    Thank you
    Yvonne

    • Dana Batho
      | Reply

      Hi Yvonne! I’m not sure, I don’t make cards, but I’m sure if you do a Google search you’ll find something. 🙂 I know often cross stitch magazines like Cross Stitch Crazy have little card kits in the magazine, so they’d have finishing instructions. 🙂

  2. Britny H
    | Reply

    I think you’ve just changed my cross stitch life forever! THANK YOU!!!!

    • Dana Batho
      | Reply

      Ahahaha you’re very welcome Britny! 🙂

  3. Janet Chambers
    | Reply

    Thank you! I have used the loop method for years, but had never heard of the pin stitch. I’ll be trying that one tonight. Great site!

    • Dana Batho
      | Reply

      Haha great, I’m glad you found a new technique! Happy stitching Janet! 🙂

  4. Faith
    | Reply

    Thanks! I do use the loop method and will be trying the pin stitch today! Makes everything looks really nice with no tails everywhere.

    I missed where you said your website is. Can you please give me that information?

    Thanks for the tip 😉

    • Dana Batho
      | Reply

      Hi Faith, I’m glad the tutorial helped! And you’re on my website, if you want to look at other tutorials just click the “tutorials” tab in the menu at the top of the page, and that’s where you’ll find the shop links too. 🙂

  5. Donna Pheneger
    | Reply

    I just saw this video this morning. It looks like it saves so much time. I’m working on an HAED with my daughter right now and this will really help. We use a hoop and stand and it’s so much work to keep flipping back and forth all the time, especially when you have to re-adjust the stand. Thank you for a great tutorial.
    Blessings, Donna

    • Dana Batho
      | Reply

      Haha yes, the loop method and pin stitch are genius, they do save so much time. I can’t flip my projects if I’m using my lap stand, it’s too bulky and heavy, so I rarely have to flip it unless there’s a giant tangle of floss at the back. 🙂 Happy stitching Donna!

  6. Jackie
    | Reply

    I never use a frame or hoop. I use a dowel rod taped to the lower edge and roll up as I go. It makes for much faster stitching.

    • Dana Batho
      | Reply

      Nice, that’s a good idea Jackie! Recently I’ve switched to stitching in hand, I just roll up my fabric in my hand. I like it, it’s a faster way to stitch. 🙂

  7. RoseMary
    | Reply

    The really impressive thing about the stitcher who described that method is that he does those massive HAED projects, completely in-hand. He posted that he has never used a frame, hoop or stand of any kind. He just has one hand above and one hand below and goes like the wind. I cannot remember his name, but somehow think he may live in Italy.

    • Dana Batho
      | Reply

      That’s so neat, I bet his work is amazing! I’ll have to try and look him up! 🙂

  8. RoseMary
    | Reply

    I use the loop method you demonstrated from the top exclusively when using 2 threads. I used to turn my work and do it from the back, until I read a tip and learned there is no need to do so. Anything to save a bit of time and bulk. However, I have never been really satisfied that the pin stitch would hold well enough, so for that I flip and run it under about 4 stitches on the back.

    On one of my FB groups I learned about not turning my needle. It only works properly if one is a two handed stitcher, i.e. one hand on top and one hand underneath your fabric. It can be hard to visualize when reading the instructions, so take your time and give it a go. The method is to go down as you normally do with your top hand, but do not pull all the thread all the way through to the back. Then, using your other hand, grasp the needle and move the eye over to where you need to come up. Slide the eye of the needle through your hole, grasp with your upper hand and pull thread all the way through. By keeping all your working thread on top, it helps to prevent those pesky knots in the thread that we may experience from time to time. It does speed up the stitching, and I find it is quite easy to use once learned. It was a male stitcher who described it, and apparently he can achieve quite fast stitching times with it.

    • Dana Batho
      | Reply

      That’s a great tip RoseMary, and I can exactly visualize what you’re saying! The next time I do any stitching on my Spirit of the Sockeye pattern that’s on my scroll frame I’ll try that! For the current piece I’m working on I’m just doing it in my hands with no hoop or frame (using the sewing method). I find it does tend to twist the thread, but it’s easier on my neck and arms than holding the fabric in a hoop. 🙂

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